the issue

The existence of poverty in our local community affects us all.

Ontario is one of the toughest places in Canada for young people looking for work, with youth unemployment rates trending higher than the national average.1 It costs Canada billions in lost tax revenue, social assistance and health care.

1In 2013, the unemployment rate for Ontario youth aged 15-24 fluctuated between 16% and 17.1%, trending above the Canadian range of 13.5% to 14.5% and placing Ontario as the worst province outside Atlantic Canada for high youth unemployment.
2Canada without poverty reports with Ontario being host to a significant number of residents who live in poverty, it is calculated at $38 billion per year is spent in health and social assistance expenditures and foregone tax revenues.

Poverty noun pov·er·ty /ˈpävərdē/

Poverty is a complex issue with many aspects, faces, and causes. On a fundamental level, poverty is not having enough; poverty is hunger; poverty is lack of shelter; poverty is fear for the future, living one day at a time.  Poverty is living without support, on the sidelines, watching economic growth, and prosperity passing by.

The World Bank Organization describes poverty in this way:

Poverty is hunger. Poverty is lack of shelter. Poverty is being sick and not being able to see a doctor. Poverty is not having access to school and not knowing how to read. Poverty is not having a job, is fear for the future, living one day at a time.
Poverty has many faces, changing from place to place and across time, and has been described in many ways.  Most often, poverty is a situation people want to escape. So poverty is a call to action — for the poor and the wealthy alike — a call to change the world so that many more may have enough to eat, adequate shelter, access to education and health, protection from violence, and a voice in what happens in their communities.

To grasp the concept of poverty, one has to consider beyond the economical factors and acknowledge the sociological impact, cognitive development that lead to mental conditions.

Ontario’s poverty numbers are growing again – the opposite of the rest of Canada

Source from Financial Post

At least 200,000 Canadians experience homelessness in a given year, and youth make up about 20% of the homelessness population.

The Barriers

digital divide

The digital divide separates the underprivileged population from today’s information and communication technologies. It is a barrier to developing essential skills and accessing services, many schools require that students access Internet resources for homework projects, post-secondary institutions often provide learning and course materials online, families and friends are increasingly socializing through web-based communication tools, and the Internet is being used to search for jobs, access government services, book important appointments and find new information.

skill gap from being gainfully employed

Education increases individual earnings, reduces economic inequalities, and promotes economic growth.

What would it look like to live in a community where poverty is greatly reduced or eliminated? Can we empower the next generation to become an indispensable asset to the community? What can we do today to contribute to their future success?

Ontario has reported a high school drop-out rate of 9.1%1 and has one of the highest unemployment rates amongst Canada2.

1https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/81-004-x/2005004/8984-eng.htm#a
2https://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/ontario-youth-unemployment-among-the-worst-in-canada-report-1.1473423

What would it look like to live in a community where poverty is greatly reduced or eliminated? Can we empower the next generation to become an indispensable asset to the community? What can we do today to contribute to their future success?

We need your help to change this, there is no excuse for poverty in a society as wealthy as ours.

Learn more about the solution or take action now.